Materials

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Thin electrically conducting sheets lead to smaller electronics

Thin electrically conducting sheets lead to smaller electronics
Queen's University Belfast researchers have discovered a new way to create extremely thin electrically conducting sheets, which could revolutionise the tiny electronic devices that control everything from smart phones to banking and medical technology. Through nanotechnology, physicists Dr Raymond McQuaid, Dr Amit Kumar and Professor Marty Gregg from Queen's University's School of Mathematics and Physics, have created unique 2D sheets, called domain walls, which exist within crystalline materials.
13th June 2017

Automation-ready new ‘i’ version of plasma surface treatment

Automation-ready new ‘i’ version of plasma surface treatment
The automation-ready ‘i’ version of the Relyon Piezobrush plasma treatment unit, is the latest release from Intertronics, and is designated the PZ2-i. Enhanced for use with automated production equipment, the PZ2-i is ready to be mounted on a robot or machine for semi-automated or automated applications.
12th June 2017

Hybrid membrane stirs the global market

Hybrid membrane stirs the global market
In January 2016 ETH researchers Professor Raffaele Mezzenga and his senior researcher Sreenath Bolisetty published a study in the journal Nature Nanotechnology about a type of membrane developed in their laboratory. They showed that this membrane could effectively filter out heavy metals, radioactive waste, other toxic substances, and bacteria from polluted water.
12th June 2017


Biodegradable cellulose microbeads produced from sustainable source

Biodegradable cellulose microbeads produced from sustainable source
Scientists and engineers from the University of Bath have developed biodegradable cellulose microbeads from a sustainable source that could potentially replace harmful plastic ones that contribute to ocean pollution. Microbeads are little spheres of plastic less than 0.5 mm in size that are added to personal care and cleaning products including cosmetics, sunscreens and fillers to give them a smooth texture.
8th June 2017

Magnetism in the 2D world of monolayers discovered

Magnetism in the 2D world of monolayers discovered
Magnetic materials form the basis of technologies that play increasingly pivotal roles in our lives today, including sensing and hardDisk data storage. But as our innovative dreams conjure wishes for ever-smaller and faster devices, researchers are seeking new magnetic materials that are more compact, more efficient and can be controlled using precise, reliable methods.
8th June 2017

A possible way of producing next-gen materials

A possible way of producing next-gen materials
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, the Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology have reported an unusual charge distribution of Pb2+Pb4+3Co2+2Co3+2O12 for a perovskite PbCoO3 synthesised at 12 GPa, with charge orderings in the A and B sites of an ABO3 perovskite. This strategy can possibly lead to the production of next-generation materials with fascinating properties such as superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistance, and high thermopower.
7th June 2017

Aqueous based conductive coating

Aqueous based conductive coating
Master Bond MB600G is an aqueous based, sodium silicate system with graphite filler. It is intended for use in applications where moderate shielding effectiveness is required and cost is a more significant consideration. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio frequency interference (RFI) are very important factors in electronic applications. The energy emitted from various sources such as radios, appliances, etc. can interfere with other electronic devices that are made from plastics. 
6th June 2017

Ultrathin material could make hydrogen production cheaper

Ultrathin material could make hydrogen production cheaper
UNSW Sydney chemists have invented a new, cheap catalyst for splitting water with an electrical current to efficiently produce clean hydrogen fuel. The technology is based on the creation of ultrathin slices of porous metal-organic complex materials coated onto a foam electrode, which the researchers have unexpectedly shown is highly conductive of electricity and active for splitting water.
6th June 2017

MIT printing technique enables flexible circuit stamping

MIT printing technique enables flexible circuit stamping
  To create electronic devices like those in today’s mobile phones requires complex chemical and physical processes, not unlike those used to capture and develop images with film-based cameras.
2nd June 2017

Metal's behaviour could lead to next-gen infrared detectors

Metal's behaviour could lead to next-gen infrared detectors
Mid-infrared wavelengths of light are invisible to the eye but can be useful for a number of technologies, including night vision, thermal sensing, and environmental monitoring. Now, a new phenomenon in an unconventional metal, found by physicists at MIT and elsewhere, could provide a new way of making highly sensitive detectors for these elusive wavelengths. The phenomenon is closely related to a particle that has been predicted by high-energy physicists but never observed.
31st May 2017


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EPE 2017 ECCE Europe
11th September 2017
Poland Warsaw
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham
Productronica India 2017
14th September 2017
India Pragati Maidan, New Delhi
Industry of Things World 2017
18th September 2017
Germany Berlin Congress Center