Materials

Displaying 11 - 20 of 773

Self-assembly process made possible with X-ray synchrotron

Self-assembly process made possible with X-ray synchrotron
Some of the world’s tiniest crystals are known as “artificial atoms” because they can organise themselves into structures that look like molecules, including “superlattices” that are potential building blocks for novel materials. Now scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first observation of these nanocrystals rapidly forming superlattices while they are themselves still growing.
3rd August 2017

High temperature thermal fluids

High temperature thermal fluids
Global Heat Transfer, has released four new Globalthermproducts designed for use in high temperature applications in pharmaceutical and plastic processing sectors. Globaltherm L, N, S and C operate at the temperature ranges typically found in pharmaceutical and plastic processing applications. The non-corrosive fluids are custom-made for use in processes that require stable media that works at higher temperatures for prolonged periods without premature degradation of the fluid.
2nd August 2017

Graphene creates transparent and flexible solar cells

Graphene creates transparent and flexible solar cells
Can you imagine a future in which solar cells are all around us - on windows and walls, cell phones or laptops? A new flexible, transparent solar cell developed at MIT is bringing that future one step closer. The device combines low-cost organic (carbon-containing) materials with electrodes of graphene, a flexible, transparent material made from inexpensive and abundant carbon sources. This advance in solar technology was enabled by a novel method of depositing a one-atom-thick layer of graphene onto the solar cell - without damaging nearby sensitive organic materials.
1st August 2017


A greener way to create interwoven polymers

A greener way to create interwoven polymers
A pair of engineers at the University of Delaware has developed a process to form interwoven polymer networks more easily, quickly and sustainably than traditional methods allow. Their secret ingredient? Blue light. Abhishek Shete, graduate research assistant in materials science and engineering, and Christopher Kloxin, assistant professor in materials science and engineering and chemical and biomolecular engineering, describe their method in a paper featured on the cover of Polymer Chemistry.
31st July 2017

Crystal turns into an electric circuit

Crystal turns into an electric circuit
Washington State University physicists have found a way to write an electrical circuit into a crystal, opening up the possibility of transparent, 3D electronics that, like an Etch A Sketch, can be erased and reconfigured. The work, to appear in Scientific Reports, serves as a proof of concept for a phenomenon that WSU researchers first discovered by accident four years ago. At the time, a doctoral student found a 400-fold increase in the electrical conductivity of a crystal simply by leaving it exposed to light.
28th July 2017

Cooling curtain made of porous triple-layer membrane

Cooling curtain made of porous triple-layer membrane
  Climate change is leading to ever higher temperatures and aridity in many areas, making efficient room cooling increasingly important. An ETH doctoral student at the Functional Materials Laboratory has developed an alternative to electrically powered air conditioning: a cooling curtain made of a porous triple-layer membrane.
28th July 2017

Thermal greases or thermal phase change materials – you choose

Thermal greases or thermal phase change materials – you choose
As many of you know, providing an adequate thermally conductive interface between a component and its heatsink is essential to achieving long life and reliability. Traditionally, thermal greases have been the material of choice in this area, but new thermal phase change materials are now said to offer a stable alternative that is easier to apply. Thermal greases have relatively low thermal resistance and offer excellent thermal performance for a vast range of applications. Their ability to provide that all-important thermal interface has been proven time after time and they have consequently become the material of choice for the thermal management of power electronics. 
25th July 2017

Very soft thermal gap filler pads

Very soft thermal gap filler pads
Fujipoly's Sarcon PG25A is said to be one of the company’s softest and best performing thermal gap filler pads for applications that have delicate components and high compression rates. When it is sandwiched between components of varying shapes and sizes and a nearby heat sink or spreader, this compliant 2.5 W/m°K material exhibits a thermal resistance as low as 0.42°Cin2/W at 14 PSI.
25th July 2017

Fast chemistry unlocks next-gen of polymers

Fast chemistry unlocks next-gen of polymers
  A team of researchers has developed a faster and easier way to make sulfur-containing polymers that will lower the cost of large-scale production. The achievement, published in Nature Chemistry and Angewandte Chemie, opens the door to creating new products from this class of polymers while producing far less hazardous waste.
25th July 2017

Magnetic semi-metal improves the efficiency of electronics

Magnetic semi-metal improves the efficiency of electronics
A recent discovery by a team of researchers led by Tulane University advances fundamental knowledge that could one day lead to more energy-efficient computers, televisions, cellphones and other electronics. The researchers' discovery of a new magnetic topological semimetal is featured in the latest edition of the prestigious journal Nature Materials. The Tulane team was led by physics professor Zhiqiang Mao, the Tulane School of Science and Engineering's Outstanding Researcher for 2017.
25th July 2017


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Motek 2017
9th October 2017
Germany Stuttgart