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American Institute of Physics articles

Displaying 1 - 11 of 11

Bonding technique uses inkjet printers

Bonding technique uses inkjet printers
A team of Spanish researchers at the University of Barcelona have demonstrated a bonding technique for chips, called SMD or surface mounted devices, that uses an inkjet printer with ink that incorporates silver nanoparticles. The technique, described in the Journal of Applied Physics, was developed in response to the industrial necessity for a fast, reliable and simple manufacturing process, and with an eye to reducing the environmental impact of the standard fabrication processes.
15th March 2017

Material can turn sunlight, heat and movement into electricity

Many forms of energy surround you: sunlight, the heat in your room and even your own movements. All that energy - normally wasted - can potentially help power your portable and wearable gadgets, from biometric sensors to smart watches. Now, researchers from the University of Oulu in Finland have found that a mineral with the perovskite crystal structure has the right properties to extract energy from multiple sources at the same time.
13th February 2017

How to 3D print your own sonic tractor beam

How to 3D print your own sonic tractor beam
Last year Asier Marzo, then a doctoral student at the Public University of Navarre, helped develop the first single-sided acoustic tractor beam - that is, the first realisation of trapping and pulling an object using sound waves from only one direction. Now a research assistant at the University of Bristol, Marzo has lead a team that adapted the technology to be, for all intents and purposes, 3D printable by anyone (with some assembly required, of course).
4th January 2017


Controlling ultrasound with 3D printed devices

Ultrasound is more than sound. Obstetricians use it to peer inside a woman's uterus and observe a growing baby. Surgeons use powerful beams of ultrasound to destroy cancer cells. Researchers fire ultrasound into materials to test their properties. But these high-frequency acoustic waves can do even more. Researchers have now 3D printed a new kind of device that can harness high-pressure ultrasound to move, manipulate, or destroy tiny objects like particles, drops or biological tissue at scales comparable with cells.
25th October 2016

Acoustic metamaterial panel absorbs low-frequency sound

Acoustic metamaterial panel absorbs low-frequency sound
  When it comes to low-frequency sound waves, traditional sound-absorbing materials tend to be undesirably bulky, heavy or thick. This challenge inspired a group of researchers at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Le Mans, France, to design subwavelength absorbers specifically for low-frequency sound waves.
21st September 2016

Tuning materials and devices to adapt to their environment

Tuning materials and devices to adapt to their environment
Materials with large dielectric constants—aka "high-K materials"—have recently garnered attention for their potential use within future generations of reduced-dimension semiconductor devices. Barium strontium titanate, one such material, possesses an inherently large dielectric constant that can be altered significantly by an applied electrical field—by as much as a factor of 10.
14th September 2016

Metamaterials change properties with a flick of a switch

Metamaterials change properties with a flick of a switch
Researchers have designed a kind of metamaterial whose properties can be changed with a flick of a switch. In their proof-of-principle experiment, the researchers used germanium antimony telluride (GST)—the kind of phase-change material found in CDs and DVDs—to make an improved switchable metasurface that can block or transmit particular wavelengths of light at the command of light pulses.
2nd August 2016

Swapping substrates improves edges of graphene nanoribbons

Swapping substrates improves edges of graphene nanoribbons
It is now feasible to make a prized material for spintronic devices and semiconductors - monolayer graphene nanoribbons with zigzag edges. Miniscule ribbons of graphene are highly sought-after building blocks for semiconductor devices because of their predicted electronic properties. But making these nanostructures has remained a challenge. Now, a team of researchers from China and Japan have devised a method to make the structures in the lab. Their findings appear in the Applied Physics Letters.
2nd August 2016

Superconducting properties of 3D printed parts

Superconducting properties of 3D printed parts
3D printing is revolutionising many areas of manufacturing and science. In particular, 3D printing of metals has found novel applications in fields as diverse as customised medical implants, jet engine bearings and rapid prototyping for the automotive industry. While many techniques can be used for 3D printing with metals, most rely on computer-controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder by a laser or electron beam.
18th July 2016

Cooling chips with the flip of a switch

Cooling chips with the flip of a switch
Turn on an electric field, and a standard electrocaloric material will eject heat to its surroundings as its internal dipoles reorder themselves. Do the same thing, and a negative electrocaloric material will absorb heat, cooling the environment, thanks to the blend of ferroelectric polymers that make up each. While these materials have been investigated as a method of on-demand microclimate control for quite some time, there's a catch - the external field needs to remain active, which is energy-consuming and ends up heating the material.
5th April 2016

Method deposits nanomaterials onto 3D objects

Method deposits nanomaterials onto 3D objects
Researchers have developed a new method that uses plasma to print nanomaterials onto a 3D object or flexible surface, such as paper or cloth. The technique could make it easier and cheaper to build devices like wearable chemical and biological sensors, flexible memory devices and batteries, and integrated circuits. One of the most common methods to deposit nanomaterials onto a surface is with an inkjet printer similar to an ordinary printer found in an office.
23rd March 2016


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