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Cornell University articles

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Bacteria-coated nanofibre electrodes can digest pollutants

Bacteria-coated nanofibre electrodes can digest pollutants
Cornell materials scientists and bioelectrochemical engineers may have created an innovative, cost-competitive electrode material for cleaning pollutants in wastewater. The researchers created electro-spun carbon nanofibre electrodes and coated them with a conductive polymer, called PEDOT, to compete with carbon cloth electrodes available on the market.
28th June 2017

Polymer additive could revolutionise plastics recycling

Polymer additive could revolutionise plastics recycling
When Geoffrey Coates, the Tisch University Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, gives a talk about plastics and recycling, he usually opens with this question: What percentage of the 78 million tons of plastic used annually for packaging – for example, a 2-liter bottle or a take-out food container – actually gets recycled and reused in a similar way? The answer, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, is just 2%.
24th February 2017

Lightning captures development of block copolymer

Lightning captures development of block copolymer
  The ability to precisely control every aspect of a material, even at the nanoscale, is of critical importance in a host of applications. One class of such novel materials, block copolymers (BCPs), are being developed today to enable continued advancement of data archiving, as well as advanced drug refinement using protein filters, among other things.
19th October 2016


Engineers create room-temperature multiferroic material

  Multiferroics - materials that exhibit both magnetic and electric order - are of interest for next-gen computing but difficult to create because the conditions conducive to each of those states are usually mutually exclusive. And in most multiferroics found to date, their respective properties emerge only at extremely low temperatures.
26th September 2016

Electrochemical cell generates electricity

Electrochemical cell generates electricity
A pair of researchers at Cornell University has created an aluminum-based electrochemical cell that captures and sequesters carbon emissions while simultaneously generating a large amount of electricity. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Wajdi Al Sadat and Lynden Archer describe the cell, how it works and why they believe it is better than other carbon-capturing cells that have been developed to date.
25th July 2016

Graphene to be used as a frequency mixer

Graphene to be used as a frequency mixer
A professor, a postdoctoral researcher and a graduate student hop onto a trampoline. No, it's not the opening line of a joke. It's a setup for the explanation of new Cornell-led research involving the wonder material graphene. A group led by Roberto De Alba, graduate student in physics, and Jeevak Parpia, professor and department chair of physics, has published a paper in Nature Nanotechnology regarding yet another application for the versatile, super-strong, super-light material.
29th June 2016

3D print system prints during design process

3D print system prints during design process
  Cornell researchers have come up with an interactive prototyping system that prints what you are designing as you design it; the designer can pause anywhere in the process to test, measure and, if necessary, make changes that will be added to the physical model still in the printer.
1st June 2016

Morphing metal shapes future of soft robotics

Morphing metal shapes future of soft robotics
Imagine an aircraft that could alter its wing shape in midflight and, like a pelican, dive into the water before morphing into a submarine. Cornell University engineering professor Rob Shepherd and his group might help make that futuristic-sounding vehicle a reality. The key is a hybrid material featuring stiff metal and soft, porous rubber foam that combines the best properties of both stiffness and elasticity. The material also has the ability to self-heal following damage.
21st March 2016

Electroluminescent ‘skin’ will soon create mood robots

Electroluminescent ‘skin’ will soon create mood robots
Imagine a health care robot that could display the patient's temperature and pulse, and even reacts to a patient's mood. It sounds futuristic, but a team of Cornell graduate students, led by Rob Shepherd, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has developed an electroluminescent "skin" that stretches to more than six times its original size while still emitting light. The discovery could lead to significant advances in health care, transportation, electronic communication and other areas.
4th March 2016

Quantum dot solids could develop latest era in electronics

Quantum dot solids could develop latest era in electronics
Just as the single-crystal silicon wafer forever changed the nature of communication 60 years ago, a group of Cornell researchers is hoping its work with quantum dot solids - crystals made out of crystals - can help usher in the latest era in electronics. The team, led by Tobias Hanrath, associate professor in the Robert Frederick Smith School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, has fashioned two-dimensional superstructures out of single-crystal building blocks.
25th February 2016


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