Duke University

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Duke University articles

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Tool helps bioengineers to build microbial teams

Tool helps bioengineers to build microbial teams
Researchers at Duke University have created a framework for helping bioengineers determine when to use multiple lines of cells to manufacture a product. The work could help a variety of industries that use bacteria to produce chemicals ranging from pharmaceuticals to fragrances. The research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
22nd February 2018

Nanowire 'inks' enable paper-based printable electronics

Nanowire 'inks' enable paper-based printable electronics
  By suspending tiny metal nanoparticles in liquids, Duke University scientists are brewing up conductive ink-jet printer "inks" to print inexpensive, customisable circuit patterns on just about any surface.
4th January 2017

Nanocubes simplify printing in colour and infrared

Nanocubes simplify printing in colour and infrared
Duke University researchers believe they have overcome a longstanding hurdle to producing cheaper, more robust ways to print and image across a range of colours extending into the infrared. As any mantis shrimp will tell you, there are a wide range of "colours" along the electromagnetic spectrum that humans cannot see but which provide a wealth of information.
16th December 2016


Lego-like wall produces acoustic holograms

Lego-like wall produces acoustic holograms
Research Triangle engineers have developed a simple, energy-efficient way to create 3D acoustic holograms. The technique could revolutionise applications ranging from home stereo systems to medical ultrasound devices. Most everyone is familiar with the concept of visual holograms, which manipulate light to make it appear as though a 3-D object is sitting in empty space. These optical tricks work by shaping the electromagnetic field so that it mimics light bouncing off an actual object.
17th October 2016

Gallium nanoparticles are stable over a range of 1000ºF

Gallium nanoparticles are stable over a range of 1000ºF
Imagine pouring a glass of ice water and having the ice cubes remain unchanged hours later, even under a broiler's heat or in the very back corner of the freezer. That's fundamentally the surprising discovery recently made by an international group of researchers led by an electrical engineering professor at Duke University in a paper published online in Nature Matter. But instead of a refreshing mixture of H2O in a pint glass, the researchers were working with the chemical element gallium on a nanoscopic scale.
5th August 2016


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