Georgia Institute of Technology

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Georgia Institute of Technology articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 20

3D printers could pose an air quality risk

3D printers could pose an air quality risk
Consumer oriented 3D printers could show up on many Christmas wish lists this year, but purchasers should be aware of recent research conducted at Georgia Institute of Technology that highlights how the popular low cost devices could pose a health risk by harming indoor air quality.
22nd November 2018

The mystifying physics of paint-on semiconductors

The mystifying physics of paint-on semiconductors
  Some novel materials that sound too good to be true turn out to be true and good. An emergent class of semiconductors, which could affordably light up our future with nuanced colors emanating from lasers, lamps, and even window glass, could be the latest example. These materials are very radiant, easy to process from solution, and energy-efficient.
19th March 2018

Ceramic pump moves molten metal at a record 1,400ºC

Ceramic pump moves molten metal at a record 1,400ºC
  A ceramic-based mechanical pump able to operate at record temperatures of more than 1,400ºC (1,673K) can transfer high temperature liquids such as molten tin, enabling a new generation of energy conversion and storage systems.
12th October 2017


Method safely produces colour-changing shear films

Method safely produces colour-changing shear films
Anyone who has a rear-view mirror that automatically dims blue in reaction to annoying high-beam headlights glaring from behind has seen an electrochromic film in action. Now, chemists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new method to more safely and, by extension, easily produce these shear films, which change their colour with the help of a tiny electric current. This could make them available to many industries that have not been able to feasibly use them before.
18th August 2017

3D printed objects capable of dramatic shape change

3D printed objects capable of dramatic shape change
A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a way to use 3D printers to create objects capable of expanding dramatically that could someday be used in applications ranging from space missions to biomedical devices. The new objects use tensegrity, a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. The researchers fabricated the struts from shape memory polymers that unfold when heated.
14th June 2017

Step-by-step process makes graphene from ethene

Step-by-step process makes graphene from ethene
An international team of scientists has developed a new way to produce single-layer graphene from a simple precursor: ethene – also known as ethylene – the smallest alkene molecule, which contains just two atoms of carbon. By heating the ethene in stages to a temperature of slightly more than 700ºC - hotter than had been attempted before – the researchers produced pure layers of graphene on a rhodium catalyst substrate.
5th May 2017

Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals

Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have found a material used for decades to colour food items ranging from corn chips to ice creams could potentially have uses far beyond food dyes. In a study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers described how a class of water soluble liquid crystals, called lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, exhibited unexpected characteristics that could be harnessed for use in sensors and other potential applications.
27th March 2017

Understanding what’s happening inside liquid droplets

Understanding what’s happening inside liquid droplets
For most people, the drip, drip, drip of a leaking faucet would be an annoyance. But for Georgia Institute of Technology Ph.D. candidate Alexandros Fragkopoulos, what happens inside droplets is the stuff of serious science. In the laboratory of Alberto Fernandez-Nieves in Georgia Tech’s School of Physics, Fragkopoulos is studying how toroidal droplets – which initially take the shape of a donut – evolve into spherical droplets by collapsing into themselves or breaking up into smaller droplets.
8th March 2017

Developing more efficient molecular separations

Developing more efficient molecular separations
Chemical separation processes account for as much as 15% of the world’s total energy consumption. Development of next-generation molecularly-selective synthetic membranes will be among the drivers for more efficient, large-scale separation processes that could dramatically reduce that number. In a paper published in the journal Nature Materials, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology identified the opportunities they see ahead for scalable membrane materials based on rigid, engineered pore structures.
26th January 2017

Low-cost technique converts bulk alloys to oxide nanowires

Low-cost technique converts bulk alloys to oxide nanowires
A simple technique for producing oxide nanowires directly from bulk materials could dramatically lower the cost of producing the 1D nanostructures. That could open the door for a broad range of uses in lightweight structural composites, advanced sensors, electronic devices – and thermally-stable and strong battery membranes able to withstand temperatures of more than 1,000ºC.
20th January 2017

3D Printing could improve valve replacement procedures

3D Printing could improve valve replacement procedures
Tens of thousands of patients each year are diagnosed with heart valve disease, with many in need of lifesaving surgery to treat the condition. Now, researchers at the Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute are working on a tool that could help cardiologists care for patients with the disease. Using highly detailed imaging from CT scans, mechanical engineers are using 3D printers to make an exact model of an individual patient’s heart valve.
16th December 2016

Processing technique cuts cost of organic PV and wearables

Processing technique cuts cost of organic PV and wearables
A simple solution-based electrical doping technique could help reduce the cost of polymer solar cells and organic electronic devices, potentially expanding the applications for these technologies. By enabling production of efficient single-layer solar cells, the new process could help move organic photovoltaics into a new generation of wearable devices and enable small-scale distributed power generation.
6th December 2016

Strong signs of quantum spin liquid observed in crystals

Strong signs of quantum spin liquid observed in crystals
Inside an exotic crystal, physicist Martin Mourigal has observed strong indications of “spooky” action, and lots of it. The results of his experiments would mean that the type of crystal is a rare material that can produce a quantum spin liquid. Currently, only a small handful of materials are believed to possibly have these properties. This crystal was synthesised for the first time only a year ago. Corroboration by other physicists of Mourigal’s newly produced experimental data could take a decade or more.
6th December 2016

Hybrid approach confirms complex metal nanoparticles

Hybrid approach confirms complex metal nanoparticles
A combined theoretical and experimental approach has allowed researchers to predict and verify the full structure of a monolayer-coated molecular metal nanoparticle. The methodology was tested on silver-thiolate nanoparticles, expanding on earlier knowledge about gold nanoparticles, and is expected to be applicable to a broad range of sizes of nanoparticles made of different elements.
29th November 2016

Achieving ultra-low friction without oil additives

Achieving ultra-low friction without oil additives
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a process for treating metal surfaces that has the potential to improve efficiency in piston engines and a range of other equipment. The method improves the ability of metal surfaces to bond with oil, significantly reducing friction without special oil additives. “About 50% of the mechanical energy losses in an internal combustion engine result from piston assembly friction".
7th October 2016

Nanorods have potential biomedical applications

Nanorods have potential biomedical applications
Materials scientists have developed a strategy for crafting one-dimensional nanorods from a wide range of precursor materials. Based on a cellulose backbone, the system relies on the growth of block copolymer “arms” that help create a compartment to serve as a nanometer-scale chemical reactor. The outer blocks of the arms prevent aggregation of the nanorods. The produced structures resemble tiny bottlebrushes with polymer “hairs” on the nanorod surface.
16th September 2016

Fabric can harvest energy from sunshine and motion

Fabric can harvest energy from sunshine and motion
Fabrics that can generate electricity from physical movement have been in the works for a few years. Now researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have taken the next step, developing a fabric that can simultaneously harvest energy from both sunshine and motion. Combining two types of electricity generation into one textile paves the way for developing garments that could provide their own source of energy to power devices such as smart phones or global positioning systems.
14th September 2016

Cyber techniques support real-world material design

Cyber techniques support real-world material design
  Multiple teams of Georgia Tech researchers are utilising cyber techniques to support accelerated materials design. Here are a few of the innovative efforts underway by research teams that include engineers, chemists, physicists, computer scientists, and others.
7th September 2016

Sieve membranes cut energy use in hydrocarbon separations

Sieve membranes cut energy use in hydrocarbon separations
A research team from the Georgia Institute of Technology and ExxonMobil has demonstrated a carbon-based molecular sieve membrane that could dramatically reduce the energy required to separate a class of hydrocarbon molecules known as alkyl aromatics. The material is based on polymer hollow fibers treated to retain their structure – and pore sizes – as they are converted to carbon through pyrolysis.
19th August 2016

Silicon dioxide nanoparticles could improve cooling

Silicon dioxide nanoparticles could improve cooling
Baratunde Cola would like to put sand into your computer. Not beach sand, but silicon dioxide nanoparticles coated with a high dielectric constant polymer to inexpensively provide improved cooling for increasingly power-hungry electronic devices. The silicon dioxide doesn't do the cooling itself. Instead, the unique surface properties of the coated nanoscale material conduct the heat at potentially higher efficiency than existing heat sink materials.
13th July 2016


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