KTH Royal Institute of Technology

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KTH Royal Institute of Technology articles

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Hydrogen extraction could be game-changer

Hydrogen extraction could be game-changer
Researchers at KTH have successfully tested a new material that can be used for cheap and large-scale production of hydrogen – a promising alternative to fossil fuel. Precious metals are the standard catalyst material used for extracting hydrogen from water. The problem is these materials - such as platinum, ruthenium and iridium - are too costly to make the process viable. A team from KTH Royal Institute of Technology recently announced a breakthrough that could change the economics of a hydrogen economy.
26th February 2018

Artificial spider silk sythesised with cellulose from wood

Artificial spider silk sythesised with cellulose from wood
  The strongest yet hybrid silk fibres have been created by scientists in Sweden using all renewable resources. Combining spider silk proteins with nanocellulose from wood, the process offers a low-cost and scalable way to make bioactive materials for a wide range of medical uses.
17th May 2017

Plastics could be made from byproducts of wheat milling

Plastics could be made from byproducts of wheat milling
As a commodity, the least valuable part of the wheat grain is the bran – the outer coating of the kernel, which is typically sold as animal feed. Now researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have developed a process to extract valuable biomolecules from this offal that could be used as antioxidants, prebiotics and even food packaging material. The extraction process uses only hot, high pressure water and carbohydrate-active enzymes to harvest wheat bran’s hemicelluloses and oligosaccharides.
18th April 2017


Plasma could cut wind resistance for trucks

Plasma could cut wind resistance for trucks
Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology are successfully testing a way to reduce drag on trucks by creating air vortices on a vehicle’s front corners. But unlike airplane vortex generators made of solid material, these are invisible ones made with the help of electric wind. KTH researcher Julie Vernet says the electric wind vortices she is testing can reduce fuel consumption by up to 5% on a flat-nosed, cab-over-engine design that is the standard for tractor trucks in Europe and Japan.
29th March 2017

Silk from milk? Method binds proteins into threads

Silk from milk? Method binds proteins into threads
By all appearances, cows have little in common with spiders. Yet despite the two species’ obvious differences, new research shows that ordinary milk can be used to spin artificial silk – a breakthrough that could open new doors for alternative plastics and regenerative medicine. Researchers from Sweden’s KTH Royal Institute of Technology and the German research center, DESY, recently reported they have spun strands of proteins derived from ordinary milk proteins, namely whey powder.
9th February 2017

Technique could lower cost of bioplastics production

Technique could lower cost of bioplastics production
While abundant in nature, cellulose is difficult and expensive to find in pure or high quality form. Now however a Swedish research team involving researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and the Karolinska Institute has developed an efficient, accurate and non-destructive way to detect the occurrence and purity of cellulose. The technique, which was published in Scientific Reports, can be applied in mixtures of biopolymers, as well.
20th October 2016

Shaping and surfacing treat plastic components

Researchers at the Department of Micro- and Nanosystems at KTH have developed a new way to simultaneously shape and surface treat plastic components. The method can reduce the manufacturing cost of medical devices, such as diagnostic tools for various diseases. When plastic components in various diagnostic tools, such as "labs-on-a-chip", are manufactured today, they are first shaped by injection molding, and thereafter surface treated to attain desirable surface properties.
14th September 2016

Polymer is suited for lab-on-a-chip photostructuring

Polymer is suited for lab-on-a-chip photostructuring
Researchers at KTH have developed a new polymer suited for photostructuring, a technique for creating micro-scale shapes. The discovery opens new possibilities for medical diagnostics, biophotonics and 3D printing. The so-called off-stoichiometry thiol-enes (OSTE) polymer was developed at KTH specifically to meet the need for a material suitable for both experimental prototyping and large-scale manufacturing of labs-on-a-chip or miniaturised bioanalytical laboratories.
25th February 2016


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