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RMIT University articles

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Laser printing tech produces waterproof e-textiles in minutes

Laser printing tech produces waterproof e-textiles in minutes
The next generation of waterproof smart fabrics will be laser printed and made in minutes. That’s the future imagined by the researchers behind new e-textile technology. Scientists from RMIT University have developed a cost-efficient and scaleable method for rapidly fabricating textiles that are embedded with energy storage devices.
27th August 2019

Clip-on turns smartphone into fully operational microscope

Clip-on turns smartphone into fully operational microscope
Researchers have developed a 3D printable 'clip-on' that allows anyone – from scientists to the scientifically curious – to turn their smartphone into a fully functional microscope. The smartphone microscope is powerful enough to visualise specimens as small as 1/200th of a millimetre, including microscopic organisms, animal and plant cells, blood cells, cell nuclei and more.
20th February 2018

Liquid metal discovery leads to latest wave of electronics

Liquid metal discovery leads to latest wave of electronics
RMIT researchers have used liquid metal to create two-dimensional materials no thicker than a few atoms that have never before been seen in nature. The breakthrough will not only revolutionise the way we do chemistry but could be applied to enhance data storage and make faster electronics. The discovery has been published in Science. The researchers dissolve metals in liquid metal to create very thin oxide layers, which previously did not exist as layered structures and which are easily peeled away.
26th October 2017


Self-propelling liquid metals to future elastic electronics

Self-propelling liquid metals to future elastic electronics
Science fiction is inching closer to reality with the development of revolutionary self-propelling liquid metals - a critical step towards future elastic electronics. While building a shape-shifting liquid metal T-1000 Terminator may still be far on the horizon, the pioneering work by researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, is setting the foundation for moving beyond solid state electronics towards flexible and dynamically reconfigurable soft circuit systems.
5th August 2016

Nanocones may boost solar cell efficiency by 15%

Nanocones may boost solar cell efficiency by 15%
A team of scientists at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia has announced the development of a nanostructure material made of what they are calling nanocones— it is a type of nanomaterial that can be added to boost the efficiency of photovoltaics by increasing their light absorbing abilities. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes the new material, how it works, and their hopes for its use in a wide variety of photovoltaic applications.
29th March 2016

Nano-enhanced textiles clean themselves with light

Nano-enhanced textiles clean themselves with light
A spot of sunshine is all it could take to get your washing done, thanks to pioneering nano research into self-cleaning textiles. Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, have developed a cheap and efficient new way to grow special nanostructures—which can degrade organic matter when exposed to light—directly onto textiles. The work paves the way towards nano-enhanced textiles that can spontaneously clean themselves of stains and grime simply by being put under a light bulb or worn out in the sun.
22nd March 2016


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