Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

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Überlandstrasse 129, Dübendorf
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Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology articles

Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Controlling drones with the wave of a hand

Controlling drones with the wave of a hand
Researchers at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) have developed a new device that lets you control a drone with simple hand gestures. Designed to be easy and intuitive, the new Empa innovation works through 3D printing and original sensor technology: a wave to the left, and the drove moves to the left; a wave to the right, the drone moves to the right.
8th August 2017

Affordable detectors for gamma radiation

Affordable detectors for gamma radiation
A research team at Empa and ETH Zurich has developed single crystals made of lead halide perovskites, which are able to gage radioactive radiation with high precision. Initial experiments have shown that these crystals, which can be manufactured from aqueous solutions or low-priced solvents, work just as well as conventional cadmium telluride semi-conductors, which are considerably more complicated to produce.
20th September 2016

Latest flame retardants are tested for toxicity

Latest flame retardants are tested for toxicity
Empa researchers developed three innovative flame retardants and tested them for toxicity; not all of them passed the test. Researchers are constantly striving to develop better and safer flame retardants. For example, Sabyasachi Gaan's team at Empa's Advanced Fibers Laboratory, synthesised three new agents that have the same or improved flame retardancy as existing products.
18th July 2016


Graphene nanoribbons have perfect zigzag edges from molecules

Graphene nanoribbons have perfect zigzag edges from molecules
As reported by the journal Nature in its latest issue, researchers from Empa, the Max Planck Institute in Mainz and the Technical University of Dresden have for the first time succeeded in producing graphene nanoribbons with perfect zigzag edges from molecules. Electrons on these zigzag edges exhibit different (and coupled) rotational directions ("spin"). This could make graphene nanoribbons the material of choice for electronics of the future, so-called spintronics.
24th March 2016


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