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Technische Universität München articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 20

Producing sensors with an inkjet printer

Producing sensors with an inkjet printer
Microelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates. Researchers from TUM and Forschungszentrum Jülich have successfully teamed up to perform inkjet printing onto a gummy bear.
21st June 2018

Observing ultrafast processes with attosecond resolution

Observing ultrafast processes with attosecond resolution
Many chemical processes run so fast that they are only roughly understood. To clarify these processes, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a methodology with a resolution of quintillionths of a second. The new technology stands to help better understand processes like photosynthesis and develop faster computer chips. An important intermediary step in many chemical processes is ionisation.
20th February 2018

Self-organising organic molecules form complex materials

Self-organising organic molecules form complex materials
An international team of researchers lead by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered a reaction path that produces exotic layers with semiregular structures. These kinds of materials are interesting because they frequently possess extraordinary properties. In the process, simple organic molecules are converted to larger units which form the complex, semiregular patterns.
23rd January 2018


Latest methods in bionics via the use of natural structures

Latest methods in bionics via the use of natural structures
Biofilms are generally seen as a problem to be eradicated due to the hazards they pose for humans and materials. However, these communities of algae, fungi, or bacteria possess interesting properties both from a scientific and a technical standpoint. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes processes from the field of biology that utilise biofilms as ‘construction workers’ to create structural templates for new materials that possess the properties of natural materials.
19th December 2017

Removing design limitations for concrete components

Removing design limitations for concrete components
Concrete components are traditionally made by casting. But the mold needed places significant limitations on design possibilities. 3D printing now provides new freedom in shaping. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are experimenting with various processes, including selective binding. This technology has made it possible for the first time to create intricate, bionic structures from real concrete.
5th December 2017

Process synthesises high-voltage cathodes for Li-ion batteries

Process synthesises high-voltage cathodes for Li-ion batteries
Power on the go is in demand: The greater the battery capacity, the larger the reach of electric cars and the longer the operating time of cell phones and laptops. Dr. Jennifer Ludwig of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a process that allows the promising lithium cobalt phosphate cathode material to be produced quickly, easily, cost-effectively and in high quality. The chemist was awarded the Evonik Research Prize for her work.
18th October 2017

Additive manufacturing: the latest promise in production engineering

Additive manufacturing: the latest promise in production engineering
Additive manufacturing processes are the major topic for the future of production engineering. Applications range from producing machine parts of metal through to 3D printing of concrete. Two international symposia, currently taking place at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), illustrate the bandwidth of high-tech additive manufacturing, and give insight into the multifarious expertise existing at the TUM.
13th October 2017

Record-breaking graphene has ten billion carbon atoms

Record-breaking graphene has ten billion carbon atoms
Each atomic layer thin, tear-resistant, and stable. Graphene is seen as the material of the future. It is ideal for e.g. producing ultra-light electronics or highly stable mechanical components. But the wafer-thin carbon layers are difficult to produce. At the Technical University of Munich (TUM), Jürgen Kraus has manufactured self-supporting graphene membranes, and at the same time systematically investigated and optimised the growth of the graphene crystals. He was awarded the Evonik Research Prize for his work.
25th August 2017

Translucent building facades with integrated functions

Translucent building facades with integrated functions
Researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed multifunctional and translucent facade elements that can be produced with a 3D printer. The technology permits complete freedom in architectural design and the easy realisation of innovative design concepts. The new facade also integrates functions such as ventilation, insulation and shading. The sample element, 60 centimeters wide and one meter high, is made of transparent plastic and makes a very intricate impression.
24th August 2017

Supramolecular materials disintegrate at a predetermined time

Supramolecular materials disintegrate at a predetermined time
Materials that assemble themselves and then simply disappear at the end of their lifetime are quite common in nature. Researchers at the TUM have now successfully developed supramolecular materials that disintegrate at a predetermined time – a feature that could be used in numerous applications. Plastic bottles, empty cans, old toys, torn T-shirts and worn-out mobile phones – day for day, mankind produces millions of tons of waste. How can we prevent our planet from stifling in the garbage?
19th July 2017

Finding the causes of water-repelling properties

Finding the causes of water-repelling properties
Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is often very difficult, in part because they are extremely water-repellent. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now been able to show how such biofilms adapt their surface texture to repel water – similar to leaves.
16th May 2017

Bacteria produce polymers and intermediate products

Bacteria produce polymers and intermediate products
In July 2015, the Bavarian Ministry of the Environment and Consumer Protection set up the project group “Resource-friendly Biotechnology in Bavaria – BayBiotech.” The aim is to contribute to resource-friendliness through application specific research projects in the field of biotechnology and to support the transition to a sustainable bio-economy. Today scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Bayreuth presented the results of their research in Erlangen.
23rd March 2017

Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets substitute graphene

Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets substitute graphene
Silicon nanosheets are thin, 2D layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.
8th March 2017

Random laser made of paper-based ceramics

Random laser made of paper-based ceramics
Working with physicists from the University of Rome, a team led by Professor Cordt Zollfrank from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) built the first controllable random laser based on cellulose paper in Straubing. The team thereby showed how naturally occurring structures can be adapted for technical applications. Hence, materials no longer need to be artificially outfitted with disordered structures, utilising naturally occurring ones instead.
14th November 2016

X-ray vision reveals how polymer solar cells wear out

X-ray vision reveals how polymer solar cells wear out
Scientists from Technical University of Munich have used the accurate x-ray vision provided by DESY’s radiation source PETRA III to observe the degradation of polymer solar cells. Their study suggests an approach for improving the manufacturing process to increase the long-term stability of such organic solar cells. Unlike conventional solar cells, which are made of silicon, organic solar cells produce electricity in an active blended layer between two carbon-based materials.
13th October 2016

Linking graphene with porphyrins

Linking graphene with porphyrins
A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has succeeded in linking graphene with another important chemical group, the porphyrins. Porphyrins are well-known because of their striking functional properties which for example play a central role in chlorophyll during photosynthesis. These new hybrid structures could also be used in the field of molecular electronics, catalysis or even as sensors.
22nd September 2016

Double helix structure found in inorganic material

Double helix structure found in inorganic material
It is the double helix, with its stable and flexible structure of genetic information, that made life on Earth possible in the first place. Now a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered a double helix structure in an inorganic material. The material comprising tin, iodine and phosphorus is a semiconductor with extraordinary optical and electronic properties, as well as extreme mechanical flexibility.
12th September 2016

A way to protect mortar from moisture

A way to protect mortar from moisture
A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has found an unusual way to protect mortar from moisture: When the material is being mixed, they add a biofilm – a soft, moist substance produced by bacteria. Oliver Lielegusually has little to do with bricks, mortar and concrete. As a professor of biomechanics at the Institute of Medical Engineering (IMETUM) and the Department of Mechanical Engineering, he mainly deals with biopolymer-based hydrogels or, to put it bluntly, slime formed by living organisms.
29th July 2016

Nanoscale rotor and gripper push DNA origami to its limits

Nanoscale rotor and gripper push DNA origami to its limits
Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have built two new nanoscale machines with moving parts, using DNA as a programmable, self-assembling construction material. In the journal Science Advances, they describe a rotor mechanism formed from interlocking 3-D DNA components. Another recent paper, in Nature Nanotechnology, reported a hinged molecular manipulator, also made from DNA. These are just the latest steps in a campaign to transform so-called "DNA origami" into an industrially useful, commercially viable technology.
4th March 2016

Solar cells out of a printer?

Solar cells out of a printer?
Physicists at the Technische Universität München (TUM) have successfully printed microelectronic components with extremely thin polymer electrodes, which have improved electrical properties. Flexible displays and touch screens, glowing films, RFID tags and solar cells represent a future market.
17th June 2015


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